December 10, 2014

Holiday Giveaway: Food Rules Print from Holstee

The prize for this Holiday Giveaway is generously provided by Holstee

Photo Credit: Holstee


Am I the only one who can't believe it's already December? Another holiday season has snuck up on me, and before I get too deep into the craziness of my to-do list (decorating the apartment, shopping for gifts, attending holiday parties, baking, cooking, flying home to Michigan…), I just want to say one thing:

Thank you.

Thanks for reading, for commenting, for cooking my recipes in your kitchens. Thank you for visiting my little corner of the internet. I'm so incredibly grateful to have you here. To show my thanks, I'd like to share a holiday gift with one lucky reader.

This giveaway is made possible by Holstee, a small Brooklyn company whose unique and thoughtful Manifesto went viral a few years back. Holstee's message of mindfulness and community really resonates with me, especially since they believe in approaching food with those same goals in mind. Holstee hosts vegetarian potlucks in Brooklyn and is working to build a global movement of community potlucks, donating $25 to FoodCorps for each and every potluck hosted (Interested in hosting a potluck? Sign up here!). It's not surprising, then, that their Food Rules Collection emphasizes an intentional and community-focused approach to how we eat.

Photo Credit: Holstee


The Food Rules Collection is centered around a vintage poster published by the U.S. Food Administration in 1917, beautifully reproduced by Holstee as a 12x16 letterpress print. Originally intended to familiarize Americans with the guidelines of wartime consumption, the poster displays 6 simple steps of mindful eating that are as relevant today as they were nearly 100 years ago. 

1. Buy it with thought
2. Cook it with care
3. Use less wheat & meat
4. Buy local foods
5. Serve just enough
6. Use what is left

Photo Credit: Holstee

Do these tenants of mindful eating resonate with you? Would you like to display a beautiful print of this thoroughly-modern vintage poster in your own home? I thought you might! Holstee is offering one free 12x16 Food Rules Letterpress Print to a reader of Braisen Woman. Here's how to enter the giveaway:

1. Leave a comment on this blog post sharing your thoughts on mindful consumption. For example: Do you approach cooking and eating with the Food Rules in mind? Which rules come naturally to you? Which feel challenging?. Please note that anonymous comments will not qualify for an entry. 

2. Follow the entry instructions in the Rafflecopter window below! You can log in via facebook or email - be sure to use an account whose email you check regularly. Once you've logged in, click the green "I commented!" button to enter the giveaway. 

Each reader who leaves a comment and submits an entry by 11:59PM on Saturday, December 13th, will be entered into the Giveaway. The winner will be randomly selected by Rafflecopter. I'll notify the winner by email on Sunday, December 14th. 

Happy Holidays!!!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

6 comments:

  1. I'm doing pretty well with all of the food rules except #4--buy local. In my part of the country, local produce is virtually non-existent from mid-November-mid-May. I do freeze some things (berries, applesauce, and squash) but I need some crunchy produce in my diet too!

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    1. I totally relate, Stacy. Buying local in the dead of winter can be rough - I have a goal this year of eating more cold-hardy greens and trying my hand at growing lettuce and herbs in my apartment. Now if I could just figure out how to keep my cat from eating plants....

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  2. I love this poster. We try to eat as much as we can from our homestead which makes it easy follow these rules—being so close to production makes you feel connected so waste feels crummy. We ferment our garden veggies for winter consumption keeping them fresh and nutritious.

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    1. Kristen, I agree - having a hand in food production makes a huge difference. I grew up eating veggies from my grandparents' garden year-round, thanks to their skills in preservation. I think it's wonderful that you ferment your harvest!

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  3. I do "Use what is left" all the time, even more so after writing a few pieces about using, and eating, food that was considered waste, but is actually quite good. I also put all of my vegetable scraps into plastic bags and store them in my freezer to make vegetable stock at a later date. Love the giveaway!

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    1. Thanks, Larissa! I grew very accustomed to composting in Seattle, thanks to the city-wide compost pickup. Now that we're in a NYC apartment, I throw away far more food waste - I need to look into the Greenmarket compost drop-off program. :)

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